STEEL COAT

Performance

  • Superior flow ability
  • Smooth non-stick surface
  • Minimizes build-up on pipe walls
  • Reduces pumping costs
  • Reduces diameter requirements
  • Provides for extended life
  • Eliminates the need for back-up pipe systems

Potential Uses

  • Transportation of acidic or alkaline fluids
  • Transportation of abrasive slurries
  • Protection in corrosive atmospheres
  • Resistant to high temperature environments (to 1000°F) Suitable for steam and water wash systems
  • Thermal cycling systems

Abrasion Resistant Porcelain Enamel

Steel Coat consists of special porcelains and inorganic materials applied in a minimum of two (2) coats, separately fixed to internal surfaces which are thoroughly grit blasted clean. Following application of the first (base) coat, the items shall be brought to a sufficiently high maturing temperature (above 1400F) to fuse the material to the base metal. Subsequent coatings will be processed in a similar manner, forming an integral molecular bond with the base coat and base metal. The finish lining shall be 8-12 mills thick and defects that expose the base metal shall be limited to 1 % of the total lined surface. Hardness shall be above 5 on the MOHS scale with a density from 2.5 to 3.0 grams per cubic centimeter. The lining shall be bonded sufficiently to the metal surface to withstand a .001 inch/inch (the yield point of carbon steel) without damage to the lining. The lining shall be capable of withstanding an instantaneous thermal shock of 350 F without crazing, blistering, or spalling. It shall be resistant to corrosion by solutions of between PH-3 and PH-10 at 1250F(Special formulations are available for specific higher or lower pH conditions).

Cutting of steel coat lined pipe shall be limited to only one piece per run of pipe for closure purposes, unless otherwise specified by the engineer. When manufacturer’s recommendations are followed carefully, spalling can be limited to a maximum of 1/8” back from the cut. Cuts should be made using a band saw with a lenox neo-type blade, ¼” wide x .025 thick x 18 teeth per inch, or finer, set at a speed of 100 ft. per minute. Insure the material is not forced against the blade, but set so that the cut is progressive in a natural way, chipping or spalling of steel coat is held to a minimum. Occasionally, a chip may go back .030 to .060”, but that is usually on an upward angle, leaving the substrate protected with a cover of ground coat. Pipe can also be cut with an abrasive high speed wheel. All supplied pipe and fittings will conform to AWWA and ANSI specifications.

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Chemical Resistance of Steel Coat at Various Temperature Levels
KEY
Fully Resistant = 1
Resistant Over a Limited Period Only = 2
Non-Resistant = 3
Chemical 65° F 212° F 350° F
Acetaldehyde 1 1 1
Acetic Acid 1 1 1
Acetic Anhydride 1 1 1
Acetone 1 1 1
Acetyl Salicylic Acid 1 1 1
Alcohol, Ethyl 1 1 1
Alcohol, Methyl 1 1 1
Aluminum Acetate 1 1 1
Aluminum Chlorate 1 1 1
Aluminum Chloride 1 1 1
Aluminum Fluoride 3 3 3
Aluminum Potassium Sulphate 1 1 1
Aminoethanol 1 1 1
Aminophenol 1 1 1
Ammonium Bromide 1 1 1
Ammonium Carbonate 1 1 1
Ammonium Fluoride 3 3 3
Ammonium Hydroxide 1 2 3
Ammonium Metaphosphate 1 1 1
Ammonium Nitrate 1 1 1
Ammonium Persulphate 1 1 1
Ammonium Sulphate 1 1 1
Ammonium Sulphide 1 1 1
Amyl Acetate 1 1 1
Aniline 1 1 1
Antimony Trichloride 1 1 1
Aqua Regia 1 1 1
Arsenious Acid 1 1 1
Barium Chloride 1 1 1
Barium Hydroxide 1 2 2
Barium Sulphate 1 1 1
Benzaldehyde 1 1 1
Benzene 1 1 1
Benzoic Acid 1 1 1
Benzol Chloride 1 1 1
Benoyl Chloride 1 1 1
Bleaching Powder 1 1 1
Boric Acid 1 1 1
Bromic Acid 1 1 1
Bromine 1 1 1
Butyl Acetate 1 1 1
Butyric Acid 1 1 1
Calcium Chloride 1 1 1
Calcium Hydroxide 1 1 1
Calcium Hyporchloride 1 1 1
Calcium Sulphate 1 1 1
Carbon Bisulfide 1 1 1
Carbon Dioxide 1 1 1
Carbon Monoxide 1 1 1
Carbon Tetrachloride 1 1 1
Carbonic Acid 1 1 1
Chloracetic Acid 1 1 1
Chloric Acid 1 1 1
Chlorinated Paraffin 1 1 1
Chlorine Gas 1 1 1
Chlorine Dioxide 1 1 1
Chlorine Water 1 1 1
Chloroacetyl Chloride 1 1 1
Chlorobenzene 1 1 1
Chloroform 1 1 1
Chlosulphonic Acid 1 1 1
Chlorosulphuric Acid 1 1 1
Chromic Acid (Fluorine Free) 1 1 1
Chromium Sulphate 1 1 1
Citric Acid 1 1 1
Copper Chloride 1 1 1
Copper Sulphate 1 1 1
Cresylic Acids 1 1 1
Dichloracetic Acid 1 1 1
Dichlorobenzene 1 1 1
Diethylamine 1 1 1
Dimethlaminopropanol 1 1 1
Dimethyl Sulphate 1 1 1
Ether 1 1 1
Ethyl Acetate 1 1 1
Ethyl Chloride 1 1 1
Ethylene Glycol 1 1 1
Fatty Acids 1 1 1
Ferric Chloride 1 1 1
Ferrous Sulphate 1 1 1
Fluorine 3 3 3
Formaldehyde 1 1 1
Formic Acid 1 1 1
Fumaric Acid 1 1 2
Glycerine 1 1 1
Glycerol 1 1 1
Glycol 1 1 1
ClycolicAcid 1 1 1
Hexachlorethane 1 1 1
Hydrazine 1 1 1
Hydrazine Hydrate 1 1 1
Hydrazine Sulphate 1 1 1
Hydriodic Acid 1 1 1
Hydrobenzoic Acid Methyl Ester 1 1 1
Hydrobromic Acid 1 1 1
Hydrochloric Acid 1 1 1
Hydrocyanic Acid 1 1 1
Hydrofluoric Acid 3 3 3
Hydrogen Bromide 1 1 1
Hydrogen Peroxide 1 1 1
Hydrogen Sulphide
Solution
1 1 1
Hydroxyacetic Acid 1 1 1
Hypochlorous Acid 1 1 1
lodic Acid 1 1 1
Iodine 1 1 1
Iron Bromide 1 1 1
Isoamylalcohol 1 1 1
Isopropanol 1 1 1
Lactic Acid 1 1 1
Lead Acetate 1 1 1
Lithium Chloride 1 1 1
Lithium Hydroxide 3 3 3
Magnesium Carbonate 1 1 1
Magnesium Sulphate 1 1 1
Maleic Acid 1 1 1
Manganese Sulphate 1 1 1
Mercuric Chloride 1 1 1
Methanol 1 1 1
Methyl Acetate 1 1 1
Chemical 850 F 2120 F 3500 F
Methyl Chloride 1 1 1
Monochloroacetic Acid 1 1 1
Monochlorobenzene 1 1 1
Monethanolamine 1 1 1
Monosodium Glutamate 1 1 1
Naphthalene 1 1 1
Nickel Chloride 1 1 1
Nickel – Plating Solution 1 1 1
Nitric Acid 1 1 1
Nitric Oxide 1 1 1
Nitrobenzene 1 1 1
Nitrobenzol 1 1 1
Nitrous Acid 1 1 1
Nitrous Oxide 1 1 1
Hydroxybenzoic Acid 1 1 1
Oleic Acid 1 1 1
Organic Chlorides 1 1 1
Oxalic Acid 1 1 1
Perchloric Acid 1 1 1
Phenol 1 1 1
Phenolphthalein 1 1 1
Phosphoric Acid – (Fluorine Free) 1 1 1
Phosphorous Oxychloride 1 1 1
Phosphorous Trichloride 1 1 1
Phthalic Anhydride 1 1 1
Picric Acid 1 1 1
Polyvinyl Chloride 1 1 1
Potassium Bicarbonate 1 1 1
Potassium Bisulphate 1 1 1
Potassium Bromide 1 1 1
Potassium Chloride 1 1 1
Potassium Dichromate 1 1 1
Potassium Ferrocynide 1 1 1
Potassium Fluoride 3 3 3
Potassium Hydroxide 1 2 3
Potassium Hypochlorite 1 1 1
Potassium Sulphate 1 1 1
Pyridine 1 1 1
Pyridine Chloride 1 1 1
Pyridine Hydrochloride 1 1 1
Pyrogallol 1 1 1
Pyrolidine 1 1 1
Salicylic Acid 1 1 1
Silicon Fluoride 3 3 3
Silver Chloride 1 1 1
Sodium Bicarbonate 1 2 3
Sodium Blphosphate 1 1 1
Sodium Biphosophite 1 1 1
Sodium Carbonate 1 1 1
Sodium Chlorate 1 1 1
Sodium Chloride 1 1 1
Sodium Cyanide 1 1 1
Sodium Ethytate 1 1 1
Sodium Fluoride 3 3 3
Sodium Glutomate 1 1 1
Sodium Hydroxide 1 2 3
Sodium Hypochlorite 1 1 1
Sodium Methylate 1 1 1
Sodium Nitrate 1 1 1
Sodium Polysulphide 1 1 1
Sodium Polysulphide 1 1 1
Sodium Slillcate 1 1 1
Sodium Sulphate 1 1 1
Sodium Sulphide 2 2 2
Sulphonic Acid 1 1 1
Sulphur 1 1 1
Sulphur Dioxide 1 1 1
Sulphuric Acid 1 1 1
Sulphuric Acid (Oleum) 1 1 1
Sulphurous Acid 1 1 1
Tannic Acid 1 1 1
Tartaric Acid 1 1 1
Tetrachloroethytene 1 1 1
Thiocarbonic Acid 1 1 1
Toluene 1 1 1
Trichloroacetic Acid 1 1 1
Trichloroethylene 1 1 1
Triethanolamine 1 1 1
Triethyl Phosphoric Acid 1 1 1
Trifluoracetlc Acid 1 1 1
Trisodium Phosphate 1 2 3
Urea 1 1 1
Water 1 1 1
Xytene 1 1 1
Zinc Bromide 1 1 1
Zinc Chloride 1 1 1
Zinc Sulphate 1 1 1

BONDING CHARACTERISTICS

A bonding interface layer is created between the base metal substrate and the base coat of the dual layer/dual fire STEEL COAT process during the initial firing at approximately 1400°F. At this temperature the absorption of the base coat materials into the porous base metal takes place creating a permanent chemical and mechanical bond as shown in Fig.1.

Organic lining materials, even those referred to as “heat applied” or “fusion bonded” are clearly and simply a coating on the surface, as shown in Fig 2. Temperatures necessary to create a true bonding layer are not possible with organic materials due to the temperature limitations associated with them.

Please contact us for more information on our Steel Coat.